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We’ve been running Q’s ‘Randomised Coffee Trials’ (RCTs) since April 2016. Many members have found these conversations really enjoyable and often very helpful to their improvement work too, as you can see from the 6 member comments collected below.

How do RCTs work?

Every member who signs up will be sent the name of another randomly-chosen member every month.

Wessex Academic Health Science Network’s Tracy Broom tweets about her enthusiasm for RCTs

Each pair can arrange a brief informal meet-up at a time that suits both parties – be it a Skype call, Google Hangout, phone call or even a coffee in person (perhaps at a Q event).

The 30-minute call I had with a Nurse from Morecambe was one of the most inspiring conversations I’ve had throughout my career – really inspiring stuff
– Hesham Abdalla

We run RCTs every month, giving you an opportunity to meet and connect with a different Q member each time. There are no rules here – RCTs should be viewed as an informal opportunity to connect with peers, however if scheduling means that you can’t meet that month then it’s ok.

Get involved:

Close-up of some of the connections made by members taking part in Q’s ‘Randomised Coffee Trials’ (RCTs)

What members say about Q’s Randomised Coffee Trials

 

Hesham Abdalla
Consultant Paediatician Senior Lecturer in Healthcare Management and Leadership, Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust

I love the opportunity that RCTs bring 🙂
– Helen Lee

“The 30-minute call I had with a Nurse from Morecambe was one of the most inspiring conversations I’ve had throughout my career – really inspiring stuff.

The Q Community has been a bit of a lifeline for me: I’ve found my tribe.”

 

Sarah Leng

Programme Improvement Manager, Kent Surrey and Sussex Academic Health Science Network

“I have been an active participant and have found the calls extremely useful. For me the value of the RCT is that you don’t know who you are going to talk to!

I have created relationships that have seen collaborations on improving end of life care and developing approaches to asset-based community development
– Lesley Goodburn

     We often do active networking – and we seek those we feel have a common interest or who can potentially help us with something. What has been so interesting is being linked with a Q Member I know nothing about – and chatting for about an hour – and really gaining useful insights or knowledge that I would not have got through any other meeting.

For example, one RCT was with a patient rep Q member. Through chatting with her, we have remained in touch, she came and did a talk at our Improvers Network event and helped us with our recent Q recruitment, assessing some of our applications. So you could say RCT lead to random acts of kindness!”

Bill Taylor
Clinical Lead Quality Improvement, Clinical Innovation and Research Centre, Royal College of General Practitioners

“RCTs for me are a refreshing part of the day. A phone call to a fellow Q participant allows me to keep my enthusiasm for QI burning brightly.

I hear of different ways of implementing QI and how barriers have been overcome. It also allows me to share information on the RCGP QI work.”

 

Helen Lee
Head of Quality Improvement and Experience, Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust

“I love the opportunity that RCTs bring 🙂

It’s a fantastic and easy way to meet and network with improvement focused colleagues.  Every month I have the opportunity to catch up with someone from the Q community to share our improvement journey so far.

The Q community has been a bit of a lifeline for me: I’ve found my tribe
– Hesham Abdalla

Over a coffee we are able to learn together and regularly swap ideas and top tips which are so valuable.  RCTs are a great way to connect, get new ideas and be inspired and challenged to think differently.”

 

Lesley Goodburn
Freelance Patient Experience Consultant

“RCTs have given me the opportunity to talk to people who work in areas that I don’t usually come across in my day to day work.

I have created relationships that have seen collaborations on improving end of life care and developing approaches to asset-based community development.”

LINKS

 


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