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Our project is focussed on supporting the NHS to move away from RAG reports and two point comparisons and instead to adopt Statistical Process Control (SPC) as a method to analyse data – to find out more visit our project page.

Sessions are aimed at people who are passionate about Making Data Count in their organisation, whatever their role. At each event, we have had a rich mix of clinicians, analysts, people working in clinical audit, operational managers and even a few Directors!

Our aim is to create hundreds of Making Data Count Ambassadors – people equipped with the knowledge, confidence and resources to convert colleagues from RAG to SPC locally. The project is going extremely well. We have delivered three Ambassadors sessions of approximately 100 people since November (two in London and one in Leeds) and have further sessions planned for Taunton, Birmingham, Manchester and Leeds. After each event, we review comments and feedback and adapt the session to make the next one even better. Sessions are aimed at people who are passionate about Making Data Count in their organisation, whatever their role. At each event, we have had a rich mix of clinicians, analysts, people working in clinical audit, operational managers and even a few Directors!

During the day delegates are taught why RAG reports are misleading and learn about the importance of understanding different types of variation and how to react to each. Ambassadors are taught how to create SPC charts, how to explain them and, most importantly, they are provided with tips and techniques to convert other people to SPC. The events are interactive and fun and provide a great networking opportunity. Ambassadors receive a #plotthedots lanyard and an Essentials guide which summarises the key messages from Making Data Count and provides all that you need to convert a colleague.

The sessions have generated a lot of energy and enthusiasm and have been really well received. Ambassadors have made brilliant pledges and we have heard many reports of Ambassadors going back to their organisations and creating SPC charts the very next day. At the start of each event we test out the knowledge level of people in the room. The proportion of people knowing nothing about SPC at the start of the day has ranged from 17%-26%. At the end of each event, we test the knowledge level again. At the first event, 28% of attendees reported feeling confident in their ability to convert others to SPC. This increased to 47% at the end of the second event, and at the most recent event 57% of people felt confident in their ability to convert others and 29% confident in their own use of SPC. The team are pretty pleased with those results! We will continue to seek feedback and adapt sessions going forward.

In addition to continuing to run Ambassador events, we are planning to publish additional tools and resources. A sequel to Making Data Count is planned for May – this will focus on how to enhance SPC charts to aid rapid and effective decision making. We will also be holding a birthday party for Making Data Count which will be one year old on 16 May. The party will be held between 5-9pm on 15 May in Central London. Email Samantha Riley if you would like to attend – it’s a great opportunity to #jointhedots!

A Making Data Count virtual community has recently been established. We urge Q members to both sign up to this network and promote it to others. Once registered search for ‘Making Data Count’ and join the group. Also, keep an eye out for future Ambassadors sessions and sign yourself up! Please do join us for the birthday party if you can and let any #plotthedots enthusiasts know about it too! Finally, if you think of additional resources that it would be useful to have to support a move away from RAG to SPC, please do let us know.

Comments

  1. The NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement actively promoted the use of time-series charts and statistical process control (SPC) charts. The NHSi recommended software was called BaseLine and they provided it with their training courses and it is still being used by 100's of people across the NHS.  I originally trained as a software engineer and I designed and wrote BaseLine to address a lot of "niggles" that I discovered with the conventional SPC software packages - most of which are too complicated, too expensive and too unfriendly. So, I am very happy to donate free BaseLine licences to this worthy cause.  To that end I have uploaded a document that includes a step-by-step guide of how to download, install and activate the standard (single-user) version of BaseLine.  NB. It is a PC/Windows application and is compatible with Windows 7 and 10.       

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